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20121201
20121231
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in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects th
town, has been killed by indiscriminate shelling in the city. dareaa is 7 kilometers south of damascus. and it has been days of fighting with the security forces. this is why the security forces target the city. it is very close to the damascus capital. they use the fighter jets and the shelling. the story of mohammad is very important. he is a peaceful activist. he graduated from damascus university. since 2003, he was very active on social networks, working with other activists in the city to organize peaceful demonstrations against the war in iraq. this is where the security forces detained him. they released him in 2005. since then, he was very active in humanitarian assistance, along with his friends, including one who was killed in the beginning of the revolution. mohammad established what is called -- a well-known magazine in syria. it is called "national gripe." ""grape." this magazine is in arabic and in english. every week, they come up with what is going on the ground. and they come from the analytic pieces from the analysts inside the country. this magazine did an important
from outside washington into washington. it depends from city-to-city. boston business leaders are interested in health care. miami, transportation, san diego, international -- an intellectual property -- it varies from city-to-city. in terms of immigration reform, what we have seen as different sectors of the economy look at immigration differently. the high-tech community is looking at bringing in more high-skilled workers or keeping graduates in the united states to help them with challenges in computer sciences, for example, or health sciences. you have the hotel industry and the airline industry focused on trying to make sure that travel visas are administered more efficiently so we can bring in more tourists to spend more money. you have the industry sectors with an interest in immigration. our view is immigration reform will be a big issue in 2013 and you will see big companies across sectors working together, combining shared interests to get something done. host: here is a tweet from one of our viewers -- how does the national debt directly effect businesses, or does i
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on. they're still communities that are challenged. the scale has treated significant challenges. this a require a sustained effort a part of the local officials. voluntary earlier this week i had the chance t
that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to document the crimes. he is being killed. he became one of the icons of the syrian revolution. it is many, many names. this is why the leader of the syrian council is kurdish and the third leader is ch
. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and her
free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a right-to-work state means lower income. our unemployment rate is around 5% or 5.2. host: 4.5%, according to this washington times piece this morning. caller: our union membership in the state is 5.6%. so it is not very high. we have three of the poorest counties in the country, and south dakota, also. those are primarily indian reservations. without those numbers pulling the numbers down, we would be even higher than that. desk because you are a right-to- work state does not mean you are giving up anything in the labor force. -- just because. host: in north dakota the natural gas and oil industry has really boomed in the last few years. is that the case in south dakota? caller: we get a little bit of that, particularly in western south dakota, because it flows into the northwestern part of the state. we are
cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes
to be read occupied one power that came back. -- homes not elevated were often destroyed. city-wide mitigation may be more effective strategy. i would also caution about going underground. everything in manhattan was underground including hospitals and emergency room that were flooded by salt water and destroyed. where does it make sense to talk about this on a homeowner basis? where is this talk that we will have to look at mitigating a part of a community that piece by piece will not address the overall impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you hav
crime cities in the country. but i never hear anything about it. the only thing i hear is every time something happens to a white kid. its national news, it's big news. let's talk about all kids, not just the white kids. host: a tweet -- let's hear more from the commander-in-chief in newtown, connecticut, yesterday addressing the cause of what happened on friday. [video clip] >> these tragedies must end. to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex and that's true. no single law or set of laws can eliminate people from the world or prevent every senseless acts of violence in our society. but that cannot be an excuse for inaction. surely we can do better than this. if there is even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town from the grief that visited tucson and aurora and oak creek and newtown, and communities from t communitieso blacksburg before that, surely we have an obligation to try. host: that was president obama speaking last night. we're asking whether you think u.s. gun laws should change. here's
a temporary city in the desert. it has all the -- it is everything any normal city would provide. it last trade days. -- lasts for eight days. it is kind of radical but radical in both senses of that term. radical conventionally means pushing boundaries, going beyond normal categories. the thing about how it is used, it is deeply rooted in the human soul. things that go deep. and did not change that are fixed. we created a kind of city that goes to those extremes at the same time. it broadens your view. and we have this roiling improvisation taking place. on government interactions. all that -- of it unplanned. at the center you have a man and the city is without like a big temple complex. and you can find those things at the same time, this radical coherence and freedom. it can begin to do something, then new creative -- you great meeting -- create meaning that is substantial. >> one of the most beautiful things, we were talking about are backstage. the idea of cultural capital, considering we're in a context of the economics of culture. one of the most beautiful things about the festiva
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
mayor of kansas city, missouri, but he's also an ordained methodist pastor. pastor cleaver is frequently called upon for words to deliver at my whip meeting on thursday mornings. i have said they are the highlight of our week, in many respects. emanuel cleaver speaks to us about humanity, about caring, about respecting each of our colleagues on either side of the aisle, of respecting and honoring our responsibilities to our fellow citizens. in short, emanuel cleaver on a weekly basis appeals to the best that is within us, to reflect the best that is america. emanuel cleaver will shortly be succeeded as president of the c.b.c. by marcia fudge from ohio. like emanuel cleaver, a leader of conscience, a leader of great ability and a leader who will reach out to all of us as well and continue to lead this organization that we know is the conscience of the congress. as we talk about creating jobs, as we talk about caring for one another, as we talk about makinging life better for all americans, there is no more compelling voice than the congressional black caucus towards that end. and there ha
alleges of voter fraud. that is "washington times" reporting on that. also, a dozen states and cities will raise the minimum wage jenna refers. efforts afoot in congress and other state legislation -- legislatures to put the increases next year -- we will turn to that issue in the last 30 minutes or show -- or so. your take on whether or not congress should be increasing the minimum wage. also on the fiscal cliff, "washington post" frontpage this morning, the tea party largely silenced on fiscal cliff. some in the movement feel that no voice on the core issue. paige, ibm member. does religion influence of politics? caller: religion does influence politics. not mine, per say, but i watched c-span all the time and my comment is religion, like with the palestinians and the jewish conflict over there, why do you guys never bring up that israel was purchased for those people over there? it is almost like a pilgrim and indian situation. host: what does this have to do with this? caller: it is all about christianity and muslim. almost like the old school crusades. host: ok, all right. camp h
have now? >> and overgrown city with too many politicians and lobbyists and consultants and media. seven out of the 10 richest counties in the united states, metropolitan washington, is the capital that cannot produce. it is the country that is still great with capital that is not. >> who in 1775 whatever predicted this? >> i suspect some of them were pretty cynical about politics. if you ever had an idea there would be a country of 300 million people with a capital that would have its finger on everything in the world, they might have been able to come up with a little pcynicism about that. >> said during the last years of the campaign of 2012, you started. >> the first time i did something like that was in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english-speaking civil wars. the english revolution, the american revolution, and the american civil war. i did that because i cannot stand the idea of thinking about it bill clinton and newt gingrich too much. nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of
to the foundation's intent to sue the city for its city seal which contained a cross and a billboard that included elements of that city seal that was in a city park. mr. speaker, this is an outrage. the seal and sign are harming no one. they are widely embringsed by the citizens of bulla kansas. it contains the words values and progressive ideas. unfortunately in this case progressive ideas are making a war on traditional values and it's high time for that to stop. some will claim the first amendment to the constitution requires the cross be removed from this seal and sign. that's hogwash. the first amendment begins with the words congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise thereof. in this instance congress made no law. for that reason alone the first amendment does not apply. furthermore, it cannot be set that this simple seal in any way is an establishment of religion. there is no officially supported secretary or denomination in the manner, this is not in any way an endorsement of any particular religion or any religious denomination. in short the first amendment as originally wr
, is still -- parts are without power. we're going on six weeks now. in many parts of the city and the region we're really pushed back decades for the last six weeks. it's kind of hard to understand unless you've been there. and i think mr. boehner -- speaker boehner is sensitive to that. his remarks have been very positive. that we need to address the needs of the people and deal with the payment for that later. i would hope this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be, by many americans, insurmountable problems. this should not be insurmountable. we should address it and we will have to deal with it at some point. but this needs to be addressed immediately. >> any of us who have been affected by a natural disaster, in our case in california, earthquakes, floods, fire, whatever, but the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this compact, are you there for us? when the storms hit last time into the new york area, our members came to us and said the devastation was so great that it has changed in some ways the character of our communities. the s
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
at the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> house speaker john boehner told reporters the white house has wasted another week in negotiations of the fiscal cliff. this is about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a progress report. there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. 8 days ago, secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts and an infinite increase in the death lemmas like forever. four days ago we offered a serious proposal. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president thought the tax rate hikes he wanted, we wou
sm. host: joining us from new york city this morning, mr. fund, i just want to begin, if we could, actually, with the front page of "the washington post." in the news that president obama is looking at proposals on guns. obama asked his cabinet members for ideas to curb violence. what do you make of that? guest: well, we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study looked at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semi-automatics are used between 2% and 8% of crimes and it said the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. and it's a very emotional one. it's at least an emotional issue as abortion or the death penalty. and emotions run high here. and we have a very deeply divided country. we have a large chunk of the count
was 15 at charlie square in salt lake city. >> i'm carolyn tuft, my daughter kirsten was killed in salt lake city. and i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed, i'm here, again, as i was in april, because of my daughter, mary. she was shot and killed in her french class on the campus of virginia tech on april 16, 2007. >> my name is casey, my little brother, derrek was riddled with bullets on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilson, 26 years, was cowardly shot and killed in california, onth 12, 2011. -- october 12, 2011. >> i'm andre, i am father of bear. my son miraculously survived the shooting, he was in the line of fire. i am here not to represent the entire town, i am here just on my own accord. >> obviously the town that andre is talking about is newtown, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story
and the national association of county and city health officials and trust for america's health. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. does the gentleman from michigan continue to reserve? mr. rogers: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers. so i would just urge passage of the legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan. mr. rogers: thank you, madam speaker. as many things keep me awake at night as the chairman of the house permanent select committee on intelligence, the growing threat from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks not only abroad but here is of growing concern, instability in governments that possess these materials and increasing interest from those who would choose to do harm to the united states, desire to get their hands on these materials, means that we must prepare ourselves here at home for the unfortunate, i t
legislative bodies. >> so you have lived in new york city. un to colgate, which is upstate new york. ewing to harvard, live in boston. now you live -- you went to harvard, who lived in boston. now you live in connecticut. do they care this much about history? >> they do. i gave a talk in madison conn a week ago. they are very interested and enthusiastic. in new england, 1775 -- in the south, only south carolina and virginia were doing anything of any importance in 1775. north carolina was too divided and georgia did not matter much. but new england was out in front. the british knew that big trouble was coming out of new england. >> why? what was the reason that the patriots wanted to be separated from great britain? >> you have to take it in layers. the underlying population in new england tended to come in the beginning from east anglia, which was the old section of england that was the most against the crown and found no support for the parliamentary side in the civil war. after parliament triad's but loses and the restoration. -- parliament triumphs but loses in the restoration. you se
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
was at the oklahoma city bombing where another american killed scores of people. larry pratt, do you think the shooting yesterday was a game changer? guest: if it results in a ban on guns in schools, that will be the case. that was my opinion when i heard about this tour -- this horrific death toll. we have to get past the idea that we are saved by being disarmed. that is not a plan. host: larry pratt is the executive director of gun owners of america. thank you for being on the program this morning. back to the phones and our discussions regarding the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. our next call comes from eunice in east pittsburgh, pennsylvania. caller: thanks for taking my call. we need more security in our schools. when it comes to guns, we have people who come into lower class neighborhoods giving our young children guns for a few dollars or no dollars whatsoever, just giving guns to our people so they can shoot one another. it does need to stop. if that can be taken care of, that would be helpful as far as our young children. that is all i have to say. i am very sorry about
, that's why they avoid doing it. in new york city police officers opened fire an man and killed him and wounded nine people, a police officer called the weapon used in newtown a machine gun and fires the most powerful ammunition available. that's not true. what's true is that there's a growing call in america for stricter gun control. caller: i was a police officerful time while i went to college. we trained and did the best we could. but you never know how you're going to act until that moment happens and your body is stressed at the moment. host: have you ever had to pull a gun on somebody? caller: yes. as a police officer. i did, because the situation changed in a moment, a second. i pulled, they dropped their gun. host: weaver going to move on to mark in virginia beach for our republican line. caller: i don't know what more can be done. i think the n.r.a. has a constructive decision or suggestion. the gentleman from tennessee, school resource officers really prevent -- they -- prevention and other benefits from a school resource officer. being in schools like a child may have an
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
instead of the way things typically are where it's for a particular state or a particular city looking for that. or i think considering that we tested that we've seen there was enough interest that 13 partnerships would apply for that, that really shows i think the promise of this strategy which has been used in germany of these national manufacturing innovation hubs. and i think that is something that we're going to look to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. paul freedman with every child matters. we're very -- i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have us fighting against -- money for children versus money for research and other vital needs domestic discretionary budget. so the question is where do we find more revenue and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and transactions or other kind of innovative approaches where we can find new revenue that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for important ry sources? >> well, it's going to shock you and many of you to know that i am not here to make news on new
: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community rather than a police organization pulling me over and the time they feel like it. host of this, and comes to us from facebook. a few of our viewers and listeners are listening -- to hang in. host: our next caller is an independent in the vienna. caller: my comment, and it is not probably going to be popular, but my stance is that ever since the schools became drug free, more drugs than ever have been handed out to kids. the principal and the nurse in the school, whether it is packs all, ritalin, whatever. find a school shooting that did not have something to do with a kid raised on these drugs. you cannot find them. i promis
. this is no lasting city we know. may we passed through it with a little more credit to end with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we have been called to live. >> i now ask the united states senate observed a moment of silence for the victims of the sandy hook elementary school tragedy. >> i thank the deadly before the words. so please do have on the floor democratic leader and the yield to her the customary one minute. >> think you -- thank you, mr. speaker. i think the gentleman for yielding and rise in support of the resolution, very important resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, conn., and to offer condolences to the families and members of the community. i join him in the words of this resolution in saluting the coverage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children and their care. the first responders your ride on the scene to and the succession of killings that were happening. those first responders, they leave their homes every day knowing they're going to face danger, and they did that day as well. in the face of
the other side of this case. host: you represent a very urban area? tesco i have nothing outside the city limits of louisville -- calleguest: i have nothing outse the city limits of louisville. as a kid, i went to summer camp and got my certificate of sharpshooting. i always thought guns or something the good guys used to ward off the bad guys bending most frequently, guns are used -- when they are in society, they are used by bad guys. i have always been afraid of them. i live in a community where there are more people who are afraid of them because they have direct contact with them on an almost daily basis. that fear i think gives me a right to be free to go to a grocery, theater, or a mall without having to carry a gun to protect myself. host: if you were in a different district in kentucky, with your position be a political death wish in a sense? guest: there is a good chance it would be. my colleague who lost this year represented the lexington area and always felt without a rating from the nra, he could not survive. he fel ttha tway and i suspect many of the other districts in kent
according to a new survey. -- report. >> this weekend on c-span 3, the city prepares to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead and listen to to to accommodate what i can to say this as the happen again. >> we will be joined in washington to discuss meetings. >> the members of congress were told -- the committee also heard from advocacy groups in this hearing. >> the committee on oversight and government reform will come to order. this hearing on 1 in 88 children looks into the federal response of rising rates will come to order. americans have the right to know the money washingotn takes from them is well-spent. americans deserve an effective and efficient government that works for them. our duty is to protect these rights. our solemn obligation is to hold government accountable to taxpayers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we worked tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to bring genuine refor
, as a do-gooder state, was not penalized. also for dish, i wanted to make sure that york city was not penalized. the new york medicaid program already covers most categories of individuals beyond the expansion threshold in the affordable care act. however, it is projected that after the aca is fully implemented in new york, 10% of our residents will still remain uninsured, which means that dish funding will still remain important. ms. mann, i know you and i spoke about this a few weeks ago. i just want to reiterate how important this is for states that already have broad eligibility for medicaid programs. as you know, that is a very big concern of mine. i hope these requirements will not punish these states. let me ask dr. sharfstein and dr. allison, can you talk about how declining funding for uncompensated care and dish influenced your decision to push the medicaid expansion in your states? >> just to give one example from maryland. we have a unique way of funding uncompensated care, about $1 billion a year in uncompensated care goes into a pool on the hospital side. there i
, the citizens from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states. president william henry harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, u.s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's ohio electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution federal law and ohio law all recalled this group as individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio college of electoral, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college. so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, n hustend.john jews d -- husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of its. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the
to reclaim land in that city that was pushed aside by saddam hussein when he was dictator. there is a problem with the rise of al qaeda in iraq and bank at the same time, iraq has not pulled over like they did in 2005. i think that is in part because all major parties are not prepared to go to the brink like that and i think there is some hope that over time the u.s. engagement with the iraqi military can be a positive thing. you can see if things -break the right way with iraq, you see a relationship with the army that would be much different than the u.s. relationship with the egyptian military, that you would really find a more mature relationship. host: our guest is a senior national security correspondent. from minnesota on our republican line, go ahead. color code do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to -- caller: do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to come to a head pretty soon? do you think we should put pressure on israel to get rid of their nuclear weapons? if we really want peace over there, shouldn't we want everyone in that region do not hav
. host: -- that is just a portion of what is in the new york times this morning. next is mary in sun city, california. go ahead. we are listening. caller: i am in the rental business in california. i hear california is very big on welfare and section 8. i see there are so many programs where somebody gets to stay home and the government will pay a three-bedroom rent and they only pay $14 a month. they stay home for 10 years, 15 years, or whatever simply because they have children. being in the military, a lot of my friends, the parents work. but these people are not in the military and they get medical, they get food stamps, they get wic. there's never a change in the programs to motivate people to go to work. host: what would you like to see done? caller: i would like to see that the welfare and section 8 programs and these programs out there, that they tell the people you go to work and we will subsidize -- we will give you a small check to help you support your little family. a lot of these people on these programs are not married. they are single parents. my friends in the military ar
: and that the wall street journal, their front page -- back to the telethons, panama city on the line for republicans. go ahead. caller: yes, good morning. i just wanted to say, we should be able to vote to congress out on no-confidence. we should have been no confidence bill to get them all out. >host: do you think that would work? caller: it would be better than what we have now. look at what it costs us per day. we are in a gridlock. it is causing tax payers millions of dollars. let's vote about and start over. host: what makes you think if they brought in 535 new people that the situation would be better than it is right now? caller: it would not be better than it is right now, but it would be better a in the future. it would get to a better place. i think the fear of a no- confidence vote might stir somebody -- it might get people working a little bit more aggressively. host: as we continue the discussion on the senate negotiating a fiscal of deal, we want to look at other items this morning. this is from "the new york times." mike on the line for independents. your thoughts on that the senate n
are sure it is a city with a decline in property value and losing the home, it is not really tax evasion. why did they do it for five years? we have a political department that might be better at answering that. host: what was the housing market like in the 2007? make a comparison of what was going on in 2007 and what is happening now. guest: it was beginning to tank. values peaked around 2006 and in some places 2007. it is the year we began to see the foreclosures and the problems with a sub prime mortgages. the context was, we were not in a recession yet. it was not like 2007 -- 2008 when everyone had a problem. in 2007 it was clear there were going to be a lot of defaults and this was potentially a problem. this tool can be an efficient way of handling what would otherwise be expensive foreclosures. host: we want to make sure the viewers understand what we are talking about with regard to eligible homeowners who can use the mortgage debt relief act of 2007. the bank waives the portion of the balance they did not recoup in foreclosure, this goes into effect. the numbers are there on th
stream together instead of the way things typically are, where it is a particular state or city looking for that. we have seen there is enough interest at 13 partnerships would apply for that. that shows the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very
professionals. joseph, good morning. caller: good morning. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a certified guidance counselor. if i could give my personal testimony. i studied at hunter college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. that master's degree at that time required only 30 credits, graduate credits. i was in the last class that was certified at 30 credits. after that it became 48 and now it is 60. we had counted professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to just be listening, have disturbed children referred to us. we had enough training that we could try to help them. we could refer them. we had psychiatrist in new york available. as anw working in florida adjunct professor at the college level. my feeling is, the community college level and maybe colleges in general, i do not feel the counseling staff feels more or less the responsibility to really help these disturbed students. they would just as soon see them leave or dismissed. guest: let's look back to the virginia tech shooting, to the deadliest shooting to date. st
city, albany, saturday and noon eastern on c-span 2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on cspan 3. up next, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined by former obama administers an adviser on iran to discusses the iranian nuclear program. and the foundation for the defense of democracies, this is one hour. >> good morning, it is a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. i want to quickly set the stage -- i don't need to tell anyone in this room about the death of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special reperteur on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and
the history of new york city, albany. next, a discussion on the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff on unemployment insurance. then a forum on skilled immigrant labor and the american economy. after that, speaker john boehner and representative pelosi on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all of the services that we have end up having cracks that they are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you need to step back and ask -- are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? now we have the institute of medicine report to think. 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? 30% of the medications that we describe? the procedures? this is something that is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. healthcare industry. dr. marty makary on his book " unaccountable." on c-span 2. >> it is estimated that it would cost -- [indiscernible] [bells ringing] >> i chose to honor both. the sacrifice of american se
served our efforts in this city and at home in indiana for the past 12 years. i leave this body truly humbled. when i look back at the caliber of the staff that we have been able to call to this mission. servant leaders all. they are men and women who approach each and every day with a servant's heart, made sacrifices over the years in order to serve the people of indiana with integrity and energy. names like bill smith and lonnie zanarky. josh pickcok, paul teller, mark short, brian neal, just to name a few. you know, i don't have time tonight to name all the men and women who served us in various capacities over these last 12 years, but i would ask unanimous consent to submit each and every one of their names to the congressional record this night. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pence: before i yield the floor for the last time, let me close simply by speaking a word of confidence and one more word of gratitude. some people look on in washington, d.c., and they are rightly frustrated. some people can't come to this nation's capital -- some people can com
of the way things typically are, where it is a particular state or parke -- particular state or city looking for that. we have seen there is enough interest at 13 partnerships would apply for that. that shows the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very
that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? stockridge to chelsea. >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to austin, texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to solve the fiscal cliff, i'm sure he'd like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song, i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. [ap
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of new york's capitol city albany. this week on "book tv" and american history tv. up next on c-span, shaun donovan discusses the finances of the federal housing administration. then the senate debate on that debt ceiling. followed by the joint economic committee hearing on the so- called fiscal cliff. >> extended unemployment benefits for workers who have been jobless for more than 26 weeks expire in january. the exploration -- the expiration is part of fiscal cliff. on "washington journal", we will look at the expiring unemployment benefits. then our roundtable with michael tanner of the cato institute. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the chief of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated the land on -- would cost 250,000 of our men, and 500,000 on -- >> as harry truman's grandson, i have to choose to honor -- the sacrifice and the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific a
of the city of gomea by a rebel military group. that hearing by house foreign affairs subcommittee will begin live at 3:00 p.m. eastern. you can see it on c-span3. also a look at the republican party in the 113th congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hersch and i started that film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bu
washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending herrmann the lack of an agreement. lawmakers have less than three weeks before the bush era tax cuts are set to expire and mandatory spending cuts take effect. this is about 10 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. more than five weeks ago, republicans signaled our willingness to avert the fiscal cliff with a bipartisan ag
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